About us - Contact us

DeskDemon
DeskDemon UK Click here for DeskDemon UK 
 Browse Forum Recent Topics  
 

Welcome to the DeskDemon Forums
You will need to Login in or Register to post a message. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Negotiating a Pay Rise  (Read 7178 times)
gee4
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5689



View Profile
« on: January 20, 2012, 07:18:01 pm »

I responded to the article on the home page, would be interested to hear others' thoughts on the subject -

http://www.deskdemon.com/dnet/userpage.php?page_id=534
Logged
chikky
Full Member
***
Posts: 195



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2012, 09:04:00 pm »

Gee,

I posted a reply on the article page.,
Logged
gee4
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5689



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2012, 10:02:32 am »

Thanks Chikky.

Will be interested to hear/read more.
Logged
Brighton Rock
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 50



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2012, 05:31:50 pm »

The recommendations in the article would simply not work in my company.  Our pay rises are negotiated by our staff trade union each year.  It is a system that works quite well for us.

I did work, many years ago, in a company where pay was agreed by a remuneration panel based on the outcome of annual appraisals.  Everyone received the lowest uplift, but any further uplift was calculated according to the appraisal result. 
Logged
gee4
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5689



View Profile
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2012, 07:30:49 pm »

I can relate to that BR.
Logged
Atlanta Z3
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 847



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2012, 09:35:53 pm »

Our company has an annual review process we all dread.  Then a max % raise is determined by the powers that be.  If I get more than the max % someone else has to get less. So it really wouldn't matter if I went to my boss with a list of accomplishments, recommendations from other managers bells whistles, it is what it is.
As one co-worker says
I have a job
It pays me every two weeks
I get xx days vacation every year
Logged
gee4
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5689



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2012, 09:44:15 pm »

And I can relate to you to Atlanta.  Seems to be the same everywhere.

I'm not sure if it's because of the job we do, or how the company structure is set up.  Either way, me going the extra mile won't make a blind bit of difference in my job, my salary, or my career, and it never has made a difference anywhere I've worked, which I think is shocking.

That's not to say I don't do my job.  I do it to the best of my ability as I have done all my working life.  It's just very sad there are no rewards in the process.
Logged
movinonup
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 321



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2012, 08:30:07 pm »

I have tried to follow similar advice as found in this article during past annual performance reviews, which is the only time  raises are discussed--all to no avail.

What finally got my boss's attention was when I told him I suspected that others in my position were making more than me.  (non-union shop)  He finally checked that out with HR, and I received a raise this year to make up the difference.  This is one more thing you might want to try, if all else fails. Wink
Logged
gee4
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5689



View Profile
« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2012, 09:44:42 pm »

That's half the problem, the PAs in my company are all at the same level earning the same salary, yet we work for different level managers and directors.

There is no annual increment, no career path and therefore no incentive...it makes us feel unworthy.

That's why this year I chose to upgrade MS Office certfication and ask them to pay the fees.
Logged

You will need to Login in or Register to post a message.

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC